News Brief: Johnson Announces New Coronavirus Lockdown in Response to Rising Cases

The UK’s new year is starting with another lockdown. On 4th January, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that a new lockdown will go into effect in England due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The latest lockdown comes in response to a rapid rise in COVID-19 cases following the discovery of a new variant of the coronavirus in December—one that is believed to spread more quickly. Over 50,000 new infections have been reported each day since 29th December, raising concern among the UK’s chief medical officers that, without government intervention, the NHS would become overwhelmed in the weeks to come.

As of 4th January, there were 26,626 patients in English hospitals due to COVID-19. This figure represented a 30 per cent increase from one week earlier, as well as a 40 per cent increase compared with peak levels of hospitalisations during the pandemic’s first wave last spring. Thus far, there have been over 75,000 coronavirus-related deaths in the UK.

Under the new restrictions, people will be required to remain sheltered in their homes except for the following reasons:

  • To work, if working from home is not possible
  • To shop for essentials, such as groceries and medical supplies
  • To exercise once a day in a local area
  • To provide care or aid
  • To attend medical appointments or receive medical care, such as a coronavirus test
  • To flee the threat of harm or violence

During lockdown, all primary and secondary schools and colleges will be required to move to online learning. Additionally, all non-essential shops and services, such as hairdressers, must close. Restaurants will no longer be able to offer in-person dining, although takeaway services can continue.

This nationwide lockdown will replace the government’s tier system, which had previously attempted to gauge the appropriate level of restrictions for specific areas.

Lockdown is expected to last until at least the middle of February.

 

 

Contains public sector information published by GOV.UK and licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0. The content of this blog is of general interest and is not intended to apply to specific circumstances or jurisdiction. It does not purport to be a comprehensive analysis of all matters relevant to its subject matter. The content should not, therefore, be regarded as constituting legal advice and not be relied upon as such. In relation to any particular problem which they may have, readers are advised to seek specific advice from their own legal counsel. Further, the law may have changed since first publication and the reader is cautioned accordingly. Content by Zywave, Inc. provided by TH March.

 

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